Upcoming Events

Industry Leadership Statement

The ORFA continues to explore different training delivery options for member access. In 2024, training will be available in either an in-person, in-class format or online with instructor led or self-study options. Over the past 2-years, the ORFA has invested significantly in both a Spring and Fall Professional Development event that allowed for blended in-class and virtual training. This format was an experiment that did not generate the expected return on investment as virtual registrations often exceeded in-class participation. The data has been evaluated and a decision to provide the same three training delivery options but with a slightly different format for 2024. There is no planned Spring or Fall professional development event in 2024 but the following calendar of events will offer a variety of different formats, locations, and dates to meet the diverse training needs of our membership.

Upcoming events

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Safe Ice Resurfacer Operator (OLSS)


    The online course is self-study, and must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive a confirmation email that they have been enrolled in the online course. The session was previously delivered as a one day classroom event, and depending on online learning skills, individuals may anticipate a 8-10 hour total session duration.

    The ORFA strives to provide its members access to timely recreation facilities operations/management information, regardless of geography. In addition to classroom-based learning events, and webinars, the ORFA continues to develop new online learning courses for its members’ benefit. 

    The Safe Ice Resurfacer Operator (SIRO) training course is considered  a basic introduction to the known risks and hazards associated with operating a mechanical piece of heavy equipment. The presented information is key to ensuring every new operator starts their career with a strong foundation of industry and manufacturer best practices. The training platform includes web based presentation that is supported by manufacturer equipment related operational safety materials and medias. Participants must complete a workplace specific passport to help supervisory staff prove that they have provided positive initial training. 

    Topics include:

    • History of ice resurfacers
    • Occupational Health & Safety Overview
    • Operational Safety Best Practices
    • Sample Policies and Operating Procedures Guidelines
    • Fuel Types-Gasoline-Propane-Natural Gas Safety 
    • Escaping Gas Risks
    • Fire and Explosion Risks and Hazards
    • Toxic Indoor Air Risks and Hazards
    • Circle Checking Best Practices
    • Water Systems Risks and Hazards
    • Safety Benefit of Scheduled Equipment Maintenance

    The course includes interactive quizzes and a final online assessment that with successful completion will lead to an ORFA recognized certificate of successful completion.

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Safe Arena Refrigeration Plant Owner/Operator (OLSS)


    The online course is self-study, and must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive a confirmation email that they have been enrolled in the online course. The session was previously delivered as a one day classroom event, and depending on online learning skills, individuals may anticipate a 7-8 hour total session duration.

    The ORFA strives to provide its members access to timely recreation facilities operations/management information, regardless of geography. In addition to classroom-based learning events, and webinars, the ORFA continues to develop new online learning courses for its members’ benefit. 

    The SARPO course is designed to assist arena owners in confirming that facility staff who have been given the privilege to enter the registered plant room and have limited responsibilities in the actual operation and maintenance of the plants equipment are provided with a strong foundation relating to the risks and hazards associated with these environments.  In addition, plant owners will benefit from understanding the roles, responsibilities and regulatory responsibilities associated with the Operating Engineers Regulation.

    Topics include:

    • Legislation and operational best practices
    • Registered refrigeration plant operator competency
    • Registered refrigeration plant Daily operations best practices
    • Equipment identification
    • Safety device design and limitations
    • Cycle of refrigeration
    • Risks and hazards of primary and secondary refrigerants
    • Recordkeeping
    • Benefits of a quality maintenance program

    The course includes interactive quizzes and a final online assessment that with successful completion will lead to an ORFA recognized certificate of successful completion.

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Recreation Facility Cleaning, Disinfection and Sanitizing Principles (OLSS)


    The online course is self-study, and must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive a confirmation email that they have been enrolled in the online course. The session was previously delivered as a one day classroom event, and depending on online learning skills, individuals may anticipate a 3-4 hour total session duration.

    The ORFA strives to provide its members access to timely recreation facilities operations/management information, regardless of geography. In addition to classroom-based learning events, and webinars, the ORFA continues to develop new online learning courses for its members’ benefit.

    This training session introduces recreation staff to basic cleaning and disinfection principles for public facilities. This online training is designed to assist current operations in proving that all staff understand the new standards and best practices for both worker and public safety.

    Participants will learn:

    1. Public Facility Regulatory Cleaning Obligations
    2. Their Expected Role and Responsibilities as Facility Cleaner
    3. Basic Cleaning Terms
    4. Cleaning Chemistry 101
    5. Body Fluid Management
    6. The Principles of How to Effectively Clean a Recreation Facility 
    7. Cleaner Risks, Hazards and Ergonomics
    8. Advanced Tools of the Trade

    The course includes interactive quizzes and a final online assessment that with successful completion will lead to an ORFA recognized certificate of successful completion.

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Legal Awareness I - Supervising in a Recreation Environment (OLSS)


    This online self-study (OLSS) course must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive an email confirming that they have been enrolled in the online course.

    Legal Awareness I - Supervising in a Recreation Environment I is a core requirement to all ORFA professional accreditations. We are pleased to make this time-tested training program available in an online self-study format that allows registrants to work through the information at their own pace and schedule over a 30-day period.

    The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) requires that all workers and supervisors understand and comply with all regulations, directives and best practices associated with their specific work environment. The ORFA Legal Awareness training course builds on the mandatory Ministry of Labour, Immigration, Training and Skills Development on-line self-study course for workers and supervisors specific to a recreation work environment. The basic requirement of OHSA remains unchanged; only "competent persons" are allowed to take care and control of a workplace or supervise other persons at work. The OHSA is clear on how competency is defined:

    • Be qualified because of their knowledge, training, and experience to organize the work and supervise safe performance.
    • Be familiar with the Act, Regulations, Policies and Procedures that apply to the work.
    • Have knowledge of any potential or actual danger or hazard to health and safety in the workplace.

    What has changed is that competency is merely the first step towards proving qualifications associated with the work. Qualification is a much higher standard that can only be met by obtaining ongoing professional development that is balanced with proven experience. Legal Awareness I is an in-depth review of the Occupational Health and Safety Act and other associated recreation regulatory responsibilities. This information forms a strong foundation for all recreation professionals to apply in their day-to-day responsibilities. Once complete, it is strongly recommended that Legal Awareness II be attended as it focuses on the other regulations and policies and procedures that are considered standard within our industry.

    Who should attend?

    Workers who are required to work alone in their workplaces are considered supervisors under the OHSA or workers whose job description identifies them as a lead hand, supervisor, or manager.

    Workplace-Specific Training

    A reminder to employers or facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with specific workplace-specific training.

    This course is worth 14 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Legal Awareness II - Managing in a Recreation Environment (OLSS)


    This online self-study (OLSS) course must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive an email confirming that they have been enrolled in the online course.

    This training course is considered essential professional development for any recreation staff member with managerial or supervisory responsibilities in a recreation setting. The increase in health and safety responsibility being adopted by every Canadian workplace is merely a gateway to the many other similar regulatory and legislative responsibilities in our industry. No two recreation departments are designed the same. This course explores the diverse, and at times, overlapping legal obligations associated with recreation programs, services and infrastructure. Each operation must be carefully and individually analyzed to determine regulatory responsibility so that policy and procedures can be designed to both reflect legal obligations and industry best practices. This training session is designed as a check and balance to known regulated responsibilities based on member experiences over decades of operations. It will provide participants with sufficient knowledge to know when additional research is required or if outside professional support to better understand and meet compliance so that the operations risk of accountability is reduced. One of the most important skills of all senior recreation administrative staff is one of information broker to other internal administrative staff so that sound operational decisions can be made. Understanding that not knowing any legal responsibility should operational conduct or lack there of, be called into question legally is not a legal defence.

    Topics include:

    • An in-depth review of the Canadian legal system
      • The anatomy of a lawsuit
      • Understanding personal accountability at work
    • The law as it relates to standard recreation facility operations
      • Standard operational requirements
      • Employment law
    • The Codes, Acts and Regulation Landscape
      • Policy and procedures development and application
      • The role of industry best practice
    • Documentation Management
      • Proving operational competency
      • The art of record keeping
      • The benefits of asset management
      • Meeting emergency management requirements
    • Designing staffs competency pathway through professional development, certification and workplace specific training
      • How to get the people you need with the right skills, at no cost
      • What must be done once you find these people
    • Creating and applying proven risk avoidance strategies
      • Designing operational tools that meet or exceed industry standards

    Participants will leave with a renewed sense of importance of legislative compliance and an industry standard tool box of information that will play a significant role in helping maintain a safe work and play environment.

    This course is worth 14 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Basic Arena Refrigeration (BAR) (OLSS)


    This online self-study course must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive an email confirming that they have been enrolled in the online course.

    The ORFA Basic Arena Refrigeration course is considered the minimum industry-recognized standard for ice arena facility personnel and is now available in an on-line self-directed format. The Occupational Health and Safety Act demands that those who conduct work in these environments be “competent” while the Operating Engineers Regulation requires that all who have “privilege to enter a registered refrigeration plant room” be qualified. Such qualification and competency require a strong foundation of all regulatory obligations to be met followed by an introduction to the principles and fundamentals of the theory of refrigeration and concluding with a risk and hazard assessment overview of a typical refrigeration plant room. This is accomplished by completing Part One of the training, the Safe Arena Refrigeration Operator (SARPO).

    Once the legislative requirements and theoretical overview is complete participants will move on to understand that the refrigeration process operates on scientific principles that are applied to practical mechanical processes in Part Two. Students will be introduced to the different types of ice arena refrigeration plant designs and key pieces of equipment required to safely transfer heat plus the role of safety devices during this transfer. In addition, participants will be able to identify the types and the amounts, as well as the storage and disposal of refrigerants and lubricants.

    Emphasis is placed on the need for worker safety which depends on the proper use of personal protective equipment from all noxious gases and/or refrigerants stored on site. Operator and public safety further rely on the operator’s ability to monitor plant conditions, liquid levels, pressures and temperatures and take appropriate action under the circumstance. Hazards of electricity, temperature and pressures are introduced so that plant monitors can recognize the importance of plant piping markings so not to touch these delivery mechanisms, not to place hands or feet near pumps or motors or make unqualified plant adjustments. Monitors must understand the need to conduct regular plant checks and the importance of recording these activities in the official plant log. Course participants will gain an appreciation for the proper use of plant room ventilation and the role of the refrigeration safety devices and alarm systems. Once this knowledge has been obtained, participants will clearly understand the importance of their role during plant room emergencies and the need to embrace and practice evacuation plans for both worker and general public safety.

    Of further benefit would be a guided tour of a refrigeration plant room under the leadership of a competent plant operator for an orientation of a registered refrigeration plant room and review the plant operational and training manuals.

    Topics include:

    • Refrigeration Theoretical and Practical Factors
    • Refrigeration Codes, Regulations and Acts
    • Ice Rink Refrigeration Equipment, Controls and Safety Devices
    • Ice Rink Refrigeration Plant Safe Operations and Maintenance
    • Refrigeration Emerging Technologies and Energy Management

    Workplace-Specific Training: A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with specific workplace-specific training.

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Ice Maintenance and Equipment Operations (OLSS)


    This online self-study course must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive an email confirming that they have been enrolled in the online course.

    Recommended Prerequisites: Participants that have completed a) Basic Arena Refrigeration or the Advanced Refrigeration Facility Operator course; b) and the Ice Making and Painting Technologies course; and c) have two years of practical artificial ice knowledge with some ice resurfacer operational experience will be better prepared in understanding some course content.

    An ice resurfacer is a complicated piece of heavy equipment that requires a concise understanding of how it works, what adjustments must be maintained and what regular maintenance must be performed or monitored by the operator to ensure trouble-free operation.

    This course is not designed to make a “competent” ice resurfacer operator. It has been developed using industry best practices that demonstrate the operation and care of the most critical piece of ice sheet maintenance after the refrigeration plant. Participants will be exposed to proven skills and techniques to create exceptional ice, troubleshoot poor ice conditions, perform ice maintenance, and safely operate and maintain all ice maintenance equipment.

    The ORFA has developed this training session in partnership with ice resurfacer manufacturers to help ensure the accuracy of the provided information however, it must be noted that the manufacturer is always considered the authority on any training, operation, or safety matter specific to their equipment. They should be consulted as required.

    Topics include:

    • History of ice maintenance
    • Operator safety
    • The conditioner
    • The cutting blade
    • Snow & ice collection systems
    • Water systems
    • The vehicle
    • Fuel and power source safety
    • Facility air quality awareness
    • The role of the circle check
    • How to safely operate an ice resurfacer
    • Other industry ice maintenance tools
    • Effective ice maintenance techniques

    Workplace-Specific Training: Please note this course does not provide participants with hands-on training in driving an ice resurfacer. A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with specific workplace-specific training.

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    Ice Making and Painting Technologies (OLSS)


    This online self-study course must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive an email confirming that they have been enrolled in the online course.

    Recommended Prerequisites: Participants that have completed the Basic Arena Refrigeration course or the Advanced Refrigeration Facility Operator and the Ice Maintenance and Equipment Operator (IMEO) course and have one-year, hands-on, artificial ice experience will be better positioned to interpret course materials. It is further recommended that prior to attending this course, participants visit ORFA’s Resource Centre and review materials found in the Arena Ice Operations section applicable to the topic of ice making.

    Doug Moore, the world’s first recognized professional “Ice Technician” was the late founder of Jet Ice Ltd. and also the Chief Engineer at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto for 30 years. He was a hands-on practitioner that understood the specific day-to-day needs of facility operators. Doug’s contributions set the foundation that has helped give the industry the look and quality of ice that is enjoyed today by athletes in the sports of hockey, curling and figure skating. Doug was an innovator of the arena industry, specializing in ice making technology, speed-painting procedures and openly shared his passion, vast skills and knowledge in this science willingly with facility owners, managers and operators throughout North America. Following in Doug’s commitment is current Jet Ice Vice President, Dave Loverock. Dave, mentored by Doug, continued in the tradition set by the Jet Ice founder by focusing on the same hands-on, frontline proven principles with an eager openness to explore innovation and change. Today, these revolutionary ice making concepts and theories have been implemented in a wide range of community and professional facilities and are considered best practice throughout the ice industry.

    Together, the ORFA and Jet Ice Ltd. continue to provide the recognized industry leading standard for professional development in ice-making principles and application techniques for all ice technicians. It is important to note that litigation involving ice condition will almost always use the ORFA Ice Making and Painting Technologies course materials as the proven acceptable industry standard to be met. Knowing and applying these established principles is essential to reducing ice arena risk of liability.

    Creating a durable sheet of ice requires a clear understanding of the ice making venue and its mechanical ability and limitations. This environment will include basic yet essential scientific principles surrounding air, water, ice paint, logo materials and HVAC-R systems. Building on the theory gained in the refrigeration classes, this course will enhance the participants’ knowledge, while increasing their operational effectiveness through a clear understanding of proven ice installation principles and techniques. Risk and hazards associated with ice making are also reviewed so that participants are aware of the hidden dangers associated with this task.

    Topics include:

    Module 1 – A History of Ice
    Module 2 – Facility Preparations
    Module 3 – The Ice Bowl
    Module 4 – Making New Ice
    Module 5 – Painting Ice White
    Module 6 – Ice Sport Markings
    Module 7 – Ice Rink Energy Reduction

    Workplace-Specific Training: A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with workplace-specific training.

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    CIT Recertification Challenge Exam

    An online Certified Ice Technician (CIT) Recertification Challenge Exam option is available to current CIT's who must recertify to maintain their professional designation.  Individuals will be tested on core information associated with the original course learning objectives and industry information shared by ORFA over the last five years.

    ONLINE EXAM:

    • Exam time limit is 90 minutes
    • The exam must be finished in one sitting. You cannot save and finish later
    • You must complete each question before moving on to the next question
    • You must complete all questions in this exam
    • To be successful you must score 60% or higher on the exam

    The ORFA introduced the Certified Ice Technician (CIT) professional designation in 1997. This NHL-recognized credential was designed to acknowledge the academic excellence and specialized expertise of individuals who work in artificial ice operations. Overwhelmingly, the CIT designation has been the most sought-after of all the ORFA professional designations. Today, close to 75% of arenas, ice and refrigeration job postings specifically state the preference to recruiting those individuals who hold the CIT professional designation.

    Since 1997, over 1000 individuals have been awarded the CIT designation. More recently, there has been discussion and reflection, based on industry needs and legal counsel, that to ensure these individuals remain current in industry best practices and knowledge, that a recertification program be designed and implemented. More Information

    • Thursday, February 01, 2024
    • Tuesday, December 31, 2024
    • Online
    Register

    CIT Recertification Course (OLSS)


    This online self-study course must be completed in 30 days from enrollment date. Participants will receive an email confirming that they have been enrolled in the online course.

    The Ontario Recreation Facilities Association (ORFA) introduced the Certified Ice Technician (CIT) professional designation in 1997. This NHL-recognized credential was designed to acknowledge the academic excellence and specialized expertise of individuals who work in artificial ice operations. Overwhelmingly, the CIT designation has been the most sought-after of all the ORFA professional designations. Today, close to 70% of arenas, ice and refrigeration job postings specifically state the preference to recruiting those individuals who hold the CIT professional designation.

    Since 1997, over 1000 individuals have been awarded the CIT designation. More recently, there has been discussion and reflection, based on industry needs and legal counsel, that to ensure these individuals remain current in industry best practices and knowledge, that a recertification program be designed and implemented. More Information

    • Wednesday, March 27, 2024
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, May 08, 2024
    • 11:30 AM
    • Virtual
    • 17
    Register

    Leadership Skills for Recreation Professionals (ILC-OL)

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    • Session 1: Wednesday, March 27 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon
    • Session 2: Wednesday, April 3 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon
    • Session 3: Wednesday, April 10 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon
    • Session 4: Wednesday, April 17 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon
    • Session 5: Wednesday, April 24 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon
    • Session 6: Wednesday, May 1 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon
    • Session 7: Wednesday, May 8 – 9:00 am to 12 Noon (EXAM)

    Course Description

    All course instruction and examination will be completed online in real time. In addition to online lessons, participants can anticipate 1.5 to 2.0 hours of weekly homework.

    Instructor: Lieutenant-Colonel (Retired) Angelo N. Caravaggio OMM, CD, Ph.D., Executive Director, C9Leadership

    NOTE: This course will be taught using Zoom. Participants need no special computer skills or set-up other than:

    • setting up a personal FREE Zoom basic account 
    • an internet connection that should be able to provide a data download and upload minimum speeds of one Megabit per second (Mbps) or better - broadband connection is recommended.
    • a computer and monitor
    • a webcam, not compulsory but recommended
    • a microphone
    • desire to interact, network, and learn from the comfort of their home/office. 

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, April 08, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Friday, April 12, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Guelph, ON
    Register

    Grounds Management and Operations

    Monday, April 8 to Friday, April 12, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Guelph Turfgrass Institute, 364 College Avenue East, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 3B9

    Building on the Grounds Maintenance and Operations course, this course is designed to provide an overview of the ever-changing responsibilities in maintaining public grounds and open spaces by using a variety of facilitators from diverse backgrounds within the industry. It further explores the diverse work environments that a grounds professional needs to be aware of to ensure they remain current and up to date and allows for professional interaction at the planning stages of new development, or to better understand how to manage current operations.

    Topics include:

    • Grounds Management 101 – trees, shrubs, winter damage, flowers and amenities such as garbage cans, outhouses, benches and boulevards all need to be managed through scheduled maintenance and upkeep. Creating a functional work plan that directs all the activities while developing data to support budget requests is an important managerial skill.
    • Sustainability Plans – once a phrase used only by the treasurer or planning departments this responsibility has not filtered down to every operational department. Senior staff want to know both short- and long-term maintenance requirements, the life expectancy of all infrastructure, and the unfunded liability associated with all aspects of operations.
    • Fiscal Responsibilities – public perception is that outdoor recreational use should be free. This may be true for the user, but the reality internally is that it costs to provide these services. This session will explore true cost accounting and how to present what it costs to offer outdoor recreation that has limited revenue development.
    • Alternative Parks – splash pads, dog parks, trails, historical sites and cemeteries are only a short list of non-traditional grounds and open spaces that today’s practitioner could be responsible for. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences with non-traditional outdoor recreational infrastructure as part of the learning experience.
    • Water Management – there was a time that facility management only feared the arrival of the electrical bill each month – the water bill now sends a sense of fear! Today’s grounds manager must understand how to control water usage.
    • Water Parks – waterfronts and marinas are an important part of many communities’ assets. Federal government has sold off many of its docks to communities while water tourism continues to grow.
    • Seasonal Staff – most grounds department rely on seasonal staff to accomplish the work at hand. Often this work pool is comprised of young workers. While senior staff are often pulled away from their primary work environment to conduct grounds work. Effectively managing grounds staff through external and in-house workplace specific training that focuses not only on working safely but doing work in the public eye does not only create a positive work environment it is a legal requirement to be met. Understanding basic training expectations of key government authorities while embracing the importance of staff having positive customer service skills is an important part of creating a successful team.
    • Fleet and Equipment Management – every grounds department will have various pieces of equipment that will be required to be managed. This session will review key elements that are required to successfully manage these assets.
    • Special Events – you get it back after the party is over! Dealing with the aftermath of a major community festival held outdoors requires a grounds manager to attack the clean–up and restoration of the area in military fashion. This session will review what is involved and what needs to be considered to effectively bring the area back to its original state.
    • Managing the Risk – today’s grounds manager needs to be a manager of risk! Offering outdoor recreation seems harmless and simple but in reality, it holds the potential for extreme liability and legal accountability. Every aspect of grounds management must be steeped in risk reduction.
    • Trees and Forest Areas – each grounds manager deals with naturalized areas and tree management, unfortunately the expertise of an arborist is not always readily available so what role does the grounds manager and employee have from a safety perspective and identifying risks. Understanding basic tree management in parks, residential areas and urban forest settings will assist all involved. This session will help identify the risks, importance of trees to our landscape, general pest identification and processes in dealing with potential infestations and the general knowledge of tree management and identification.
    • High Calibre Field Case Study - This session will explore the science of sport field design and sport specific requirements of one of Ontario’s state of the art sports fields. The session will be led by an industry leader(s) who has been actively involved in the design, operation and facility requirements pertaining to hosting high level international and/or professional sporting and/or entertainment events. Specific attention will be given to the operation, maintenance, and budgeting necessary to be considered a profit focused sports field.
    • Air Supported Structures - This session will cover the history of the “Bubble” (air supported structure) and will highlight the costs to purchase, lease and operate said facilities. It will also cover maintenance, operational and replacement issues and concerns while highlighting the pros and cons of these facilities versus the brick-and-mortar type of recreational facilities. Alternative building offerings play an important role in a grounds manager’s ability to meet the client’s needs while finding a solution to the effects we now face as part of our changing climate and operational seasons.

    The ORFA has partnered with Sports Turf Canada (STC) to present the following two sessions:

    • Understanding Synthetic Turf – the myth that artificial turf is no/low maintenance is explored in depth. Construction methods, materials, maintenance equipment and staffing requirements will all be discussed. Understanding the complexities associated with a synthetic sports field is an important part of managing these environments. This session will provide a complete overview on what is required to be successful in maintaining artificial turf.
    • Understanding Natural Turf – the old saying of “building it and they will come” has been updated to “build it right and they can come every day to play”. Understanding the science involved with creating and maintaining live turf is key to a safe and durable natural sports field. This session will provide a complete overview on what is required to be successful in maintaining natural turf.

    Instructor: Frank Cain, Facility and Business Development Manager, University of Guelph

    This course is worth 35 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, April 08, 2024
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Bradford, ON
    Register

    2024 PRACTICUM IN-PERSON WORKSHOP SERIES

    Advancement in Ice Painting, Markings and Logo Installation Best Practice

    April 8, 2024 - Bradford, ON

    This workshop will include a theoretical and on-ice demonstration review of ice maker techniques, expert tips and troubleshooting experience. Designed for all levels of ice technicians who have ice installation responsibilities. The day will include a tour of the Jet Ice manufacturing plant.

    This practicum is worth 7 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Wednesday, April 10, 2024
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Brantford, ON
    Register

    2024 PRACTICUM IN-PERSON WORKSHOP SERIES

    Zamboni Maintenance and Equipment Adjustment Best Practices

    April 10, 2024 - Brantford, ON

    This workshop will include a theoretical and demonstration of ice resurfacer maintenance, adjustment and troubleshooting specific to Zamboni ice maintenance equipment. Designed for all levels of ice technicians who operate, inspect, and perform minor maintenance and adjustments to Zamboni equipment. The day will end with a tour of the Zamboni manufacturing plant where participants can hear from Zamboni team experts on how to ensure a trouble-free operational season.

    This practicum is worth 7 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Tuesday, April 16, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Thursday, April 18, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Strathroy, ON
    Register

    Basic Arena Refrigeration (BAR)

    Tuesday, April 16 to Thursday, April 18, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

    Gemini Sportsplex, Wescast Room, 667 Adair Blvd., Strathroy, ON

    The ORFA Basic Arena Refrigeration course is considered the minimum industry-recognized standard for ice arena facility personnel. The Occupational Health and Safety Act demands that those who conduct work in these environments be “competent” while the Operating Engineers Regulation requires that all who have “privilege to enter a registered refrigeration plant room” be qualified. Such qualification and competency require a strong foundation of all regulatory obligations to be met followed by an introduction to the principles and fundamentals of the theory of refrigeration and concluding with a risk and hazard assessment overview of a typical refrigeration plant room.

    Once the legislative requirements and theoretical overview is complete participants will move on to understand that the refrigeration process operates on scientific principles that are applied to practical mechanical processes in Part Two. Students will be introduced to the different types of ice arena refrigeration plant designs and key pieces of equipment required to safely transfer heat plus the role of safety devices during this transfer. In addition, participants will be able to identify the types and the amounts, as well as the storage and disposal of refrigerants and lubricants.

    Emphasis is placed on the need for worker safety which depends on the proper use of personal protective equipment from all noxious gases and/or refrigerants stored on site. Operator and public safety further rely on the operator’s ability to monitor plant conditions, liquid levels, pressures, and temperatures and take appropriate action under the circumstance. Hazards of electricity, temperature and pressures are introduced so that plant monitors can recognize the importance of plant piping markings so not to touch these delivery mechanisms, not to place hands or feet near pumps or motors or make unqualified plant adjustments. Monitors must understand the need to conduct regular plant checks and the importance of recording these activities in the official plant log. Course participants will gain an appreciation for the proper use of plant room ventilation and the role of the refrigeration safety devices and alarm systems. Once this knowledge has been obtained, participants will clearly understand the importance of their role during plant room emergencies and the need to embrace and practice evacuation plans for both worker and general public safety.

    Of further benefit would be a guided tour of a refrigeration plant room under the leadership of a competent plant operator for an orientation of a registered refrigeration plant room and review the plant operational and training manuals.

    Topics include:

    • Refrigeration Theoretical and Practical Factors
    • Refrigeration Codes, Regulations and Acts
    • Ice Rink Refrigeration Equipment, Controls and Safety Devices
    • Ice Rink Refrigeration Plant Safe Operations and Maintenance
    • Refrigeration Emerging Technologies and Energy Management

    Workplace-Specific Training: A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with specific workplace-specific training.

    Online Exam: Exam must be completed online within 30 days of attending the in-person course.

    Instructor: Robert Lilbourne, CRFP, CIT, Director of Community Services, Municipality of Strathroy-Caradoc

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, April 22, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Wednesday, April 24, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Markham, ON
    Register

    Advanced Refrigeration Facility Operator

    Monday, April 22 to Wednesday, April 24

    Thornhill Community Centre, Fireside Lounge 7755 Bayview Avenue, Markham ON L3T 4P1

    The course is designed to enhance the knowledge and skills of practitioners who are considered to be the “user” as defined in the Operating Engineers Regulation of a registered “unattended” industrial ice sheet refrigeration plant. It builds on the knowledge learned in the ORFA Basic Arena Refrigeration course which is a recommended course pre-requisite. Participants will gain a strong working knowledge of roles and responsibilities associated with the operation, management and maintenance of these systems. Course curriculum is built on current regulatory responsibilities and accepted industry best practices. The learning objectives are recognized by the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) as minimum training for those individuals who are responsible for decision making surrounding the day-to-day care and control of these plant rooms. Participants will receive all necessary tools to evaluate and/or build an ice sheet refrigeration workplace specific training, operational and maintenance program.

    Topics include:

    • Module 1 - Defining Who Is In Care & Control of the Registered Ice Sheet Refrigeration Plant 
    • Module 2 - The Responsibility of Creating a Safe Registered Ice Sheet Refrigeration Plant Room 
    • Module 3 – The Responsibility of Mentoring Ice Sheet Refrigeration Plant Room Staff 
    • Module 4 – Creating and Maintaining a Plant Operational and Training Manual 
    • Module 5 - The Responsibility of Creating an Effective Registered Refrigeration Plant Maintenance Plan 
    • Module 6 – The Responsibility of Designing a Registered Refrigeration Plant Asset Management Plan 
    • Module 7 – The Responsibility of Registered Ice Sheet Refrigeration Emergency Planning 
    Online Exam: Exam must be completed online within 30 days of attending the in-person course.

    This is a recommended course for the ORFA Certified Arena Refrigeration Plant Technician (CARPT) designation. This course is also recommended ongoing professional development for B-Certificate Operators who are employed in the ice sheet industry.

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, April 22, 2024
    • 9:00 AM
    • Wednesday, April 24, 2024
    • 4:00 PM
    • Halton Hills, ON
    • 30
    Register

    Ice Maintenance and Equipment Operations

    Monday, April 22 to Wednesday, April 24, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Mold-Masters SportsPlex, 221 Guelph Street, Halton Hills ON L7G 4A8

    Course Information

    Prerequisites: Participants should have completed a) Basic Arena Refrigeration or the Advanced Refrigeration Facility Operator course; b) and the Ice Making and Painting Technologies course; and c) have two years of practical artificial ice knowledge with some ice resurfacer operational experience or a Safe Ice Resurfacer Operator permit.

    Workplace-Specific Training: Please note this course does not provide participants with hands-on training in driving an ice resurfacer. A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with specific workplace-specific training.

    Personal Protective Equipment Required: Participants attending this course are required to supply and wear their own CSA-approved head protection, layered clothing, and appropriate footwear suitable for an ice arena environment. No exceptions.

    Instructor: John Archibald, CRFP, CIT, PM, CPO, AMCT, former Facility Supervisor, Town of Halton Hills (retired)

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, May 06, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Wednesday, May 08, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Petawawa, ON
    Register

    Grounds Operations and Maintenance

    Monday, May 6 to Wednesday, May 8, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Petawawa Civic Centre, Banquet Hall, 16 Civic Centre Road, Petawawa ON K8H 3H5

    Today’s recreation practitioner often has an evolving job description that requires that they have a variety of skill sets. Grounds operations includes, but is not limited to, ensuring safe building entrance and egress access, grass and shrubs that surround a facility, parking lot maintenance moving onto the cross trained worker, who may cut ice in the winter and grass at sport fields, parks or other public open spaces in the summer. The demand for low impact recreational experiences creates additional responsibilities for traditional indoor staff who are given responsibilities for trails, outdoor aquatic features, historical locations, tennis courts, marinas and whatever the public demands of community leaders. Grounds workers are given a variety of basic and advanced tools to assist in their duties. Each has its own inherent risk and hazards attached to improper use. This course is designed to introduce the next generation of recreation grounds professionals to the opportunities associated with grounds maintenance, while challenging experienced workers that may have entered the industry with limited training. It is considered the industry standard for the cross-trained recreation worker. Participants will leave with a clear understanding of the complexities associated with grounds operations and what role they play in maintaining these environments.

    Topics include:

    • An introduction and history of Ontario outdoor recreational experiences and infrastructure
    • Legislation and regulations that guide outdoor leisure activities
    • Applying basic health and safety principles with a goal of increasing how they must be adopted specific to this type of work
    • Working safely outdoors – knowing the risks associated with changing weather patterns, sun exposure, heat risks, chemical use, heavy lifting, working alone, insect and animal risks, hazardous weeds identification and management, sharps, etc.
    • The importance of comprehensive playground equipment, sports fields, and greenspace inspections
    • The risks and hazards associated with maintaining public trails and walkways for trip and slip hazards
    • Dealing with illegal behaviour involving drugs and/or alcohol
    • Staff role in offering safe significant community events
    • An understanding of basic terms and terminology associated with ground maintenance tools
    • Getting equipment safely to and from the work location
    • Grounds tool safety
    • Identification of grounds equipment that require specific training and or certification prior to use by any worker
    • Fossil fuel safety
    • Outdoor winter recreational grounds maintenance and upkeep
    • Proper record keeping

    Instructor: Mark Reinert, CRFP, CIT, CPT, Manager of Civic Properties, Town of Petawawa

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, May 06, 2024
    • 9:00 AM
    • Friday, May 17, 2024
    • 12:00 PM
    • Virtual
    • 16
    Register

    Advanced Recreation Facilities Business Management I (ILC-OL)

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    • Session 1: Project Management: Monday, May 6 and Tuesday, May 7, 9 am to 12 noon
    • Session 2: Asset Management: Wednesday, May 8 and Thursday, May 9, 9 am to 12 noon
    • Session 3: Strategic Planning: Friday, May 10 and Monday, May 13, 9 am to 12 noon
    • Session 4: Budgeting and Financial Management: Tuesday, May 14 and Wednesday, May 15, 9 am to 12 noon
    • Session 5: Risk Management: Thursday, May 16 and Friday, May 17, 9 am to 12 noon

    Course Description

    Instructors: Steve Hardie, RRFA, CIT, CPT, CAP, Project Manager, Community Services, Town of Saugeen Shores; Zack Tarantino, Sales Executive, Marmak; David Clark, Principal, David A. Clark Consulting; Donna Herridge, CPA, CA, Executive Director, Calvin Barrett, CPA, CA, Municipal Finance Officers' Association of Ontario; Tracy Eso, BFA, CIP, CRM, ACI, Risk Assessment & Solutions Manager, Intact Public Entities

    NOTE: This course will be taught using Zoom. Participants need no special computer skills or set-up other than:

    • setting up a personal FREE Zoom basic account 
    • an internet connection that should be able to provide a data download and upload minimum speeds of one Megabit per second (Mbps) or better - broadband connection is recommended.
    • a computer and monitor
    • a webcam, not compulsory but recommended
    • a microphone
    • desire to interact, network, and learn from the comfort of their home/office. 

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Tuesday, May 07, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Thursday, May 09, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Belleville, ON
    • 30
    Register

    Ice Making and Painting Technologies

    Tuesday, May 7 to Thursday, May 9 - 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre, 265 Cannifton Road, Belleville ON K8N 4V8

    Course Information

    Prerequisites: Participants should have completed the Basic Arena Refrigeration course or the Advanced Refrigeration Facility Operator course and have one-year, hands-on, artificial ice experience. It is further recommended that prior to attending this course, participants visit ORFA’s Resource Centre and review materials found in the Arena Ice Operations section www.orfa.com/Ice-Arena-Operations applicable to the topic of ice making

    Workplace-Specific Training: A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with workplace-specific training.

    Personal Protective Equipment Required: Participants attending this course are required to supply and wear their own CSA-approved head protection, layered clothing, and appropriate footwear suitable for an ice arena environment. No exception.

    Instructor: Kevin Hill, CRFP, CIT, Principal, Eastern Rink Services Limited

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, May 13, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Tuesday, May 14, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Bowmanville, ON
    • 20
    Register

    Pool & Hot Tub Alliance Certified Pool & Spa Operator® (CPO®)

    Monday, May 13 and Tuesday, May 14, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Garnet B. Rickard Recreation Complex, Hall 3, 2440 Hwy 2, Bowmanville ON L1C 0K6

    The Certified Pool & Spa Operator® (CPO®) certification program is the world’s leading education and certification program for keeping pools safer and keeping them open. Over 400,000 students have been trained since 1972. CPO certification provides individuals with the knowledge, techniques, and skills required for proper pool operations.
    You will learn how to:

    • Reduce risks in and around the water
    • Prevent drowning, recreational water illness, suction entrapment, evisceration, diving accidents, electrocutions, chemical hazards, and slips and falls
    • Address regulatory guidelines
    • Maintain disinfection and water balance
    • Manage water problems
    • Perform troubleshooting, chemical testing, and record keeping
    • Manage chemical feed
    • Utilize automation and technology

    Course Resource: The Certified Pool & Spa Operator™ Handbook
    This fundamental training and reference manual is for aquatic professionals, including operators, health officials, service technicians, retailers, property managers, and manufacturers. Industry leaders recognize this handbook as the single most important resource for the recreational water industry. Handbook features include:

    • Full color throughout
    • Color-coded chapter identification
    • Expanded keyword index and table of contents
    • Mathematical and calculation guides

    Course Attendance, Examination, Recertification
    Each participant must attend two days of course instruction and pass the three-hour examination with a minimum 75% grade in order to become certified.

    CPO certifications are valid for five years. For complete recertification information visit www.phta.org/certification/recertify/maintain-your-certification

    Instructor: Ross Rankin CRFP, CAT, CPO, Property and Project Manager, Town of Carleton Place

    This course is worth 14 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, May 13, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Friday, May 24, 2024
    • 12:30 PM
    • Virtual
    • 17
    Register

    Events Planning and Management (ILC-OL)

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    • Session 1: Monday, May 13, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 2: Tuesday, May 14, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 3: Wednesday, May 15, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 4: Thursday, May 16, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 5: Tuesday, May 21, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 6: Wednesday, May 22, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 7: Thursday, May 23, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
    • Session 8: Friday, May 24, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm

    Course Description

    Instructors: Cathy Seguin, Nipissing Community Engagement Coordinator, United Way Centraide

    NOTE: This course will be taught using Zoom. Participants need no special computer skills or set-up other than:

    • setting up a personal FREE Zoom basic account 
    • an internet connection that should be able to provide a data download and upload minimum speeds of one Megabit per second (Mbps) or better - broadband connection is recommended.
    • a computer and monitor
    • a webcam, not compulsory but recommended
    • a microphone
    • desire to interact, network, and learn from the comfort of their home/office. 

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Wednesday, May 15, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Friday, May 17, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Virtual
    • 20
    Register

    Aquatic Facility Operations

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    Wednesday, May 15 to Friday, May 17, 2023, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

    The ORFA Aquatic Facility Operations course reflects the diversity of today’s Ontario’s public water recreation infrastructure. Through extensive member evaluation and feedback, the ORFA has shifted the learning focus from traditional Class A & B swimming pool operational responsibilities towards the different types of recreational aquatic facilities that includes the newly classified Class C pools. This advanced aquatic training course is considered industry leading as it takes practitioners who have obtained a Certified Pool Operator (CPO) credential, or other similar introductory aquatic training course, with an advanced study of aquatic facility operations. The ORFA worked closely with the former National Swimming Pool Foundation (NSPF) and the Canadian Red Cross (CRC), to develop an enhanced curriculum specific to meet the learning needs of Ontario aquatic professionals. The educational approach includes an opportunity for professional aquatic operational staff to enhance their aquatic training and workplace experience while allowing recreation staff who are responsible for non-traditional water operations to attend and learn of their responsibilities, and how to effectively operate and maintain the equipment and infrastructure.

    This course is a required educational component of ORFA’s Certified Aquatic Technician (CAT) professional designation. Positioned as an equivalent to ORFA’s highly respected Certified Ice Technician designation, the CAT credential is positioned to be in high demand by employers. Participants will be provided with a self-directed guide titled Passport Toward Competency. The guide will list recommended workplace-specific, as well as educational activities, to assist the participants in achieving aquatic facility operations competency, as best determined by their employer.

    Topics include:

    • Indoor and outdoor Class A & C pool regulatory compliance and operational best practices
    • Aquatic mechanical room equipment maintenance best practices
    • A review of advancements in water disinfection and chemistry
    • Waterslide, saunas, steam rooms etc. maintenance and upkeep
    • Pool chemical safety and management
    • Indoor pool air quality
    • Maintaining aquatic sensing equipment
    • Indoor and outdoor aquatic PPE
    • Outdoor pool operational best practices
    • Working alone safely in an aquatic environment
    • Workplace injuries and reporting compliance
    • Completing efficient logbook entries
    • Aquatic housekeeping risks, hazards and best practices
    • Risk reduction and avoidance strategies
    • Emergency preparedness and management

    Please Note:

    According to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care – Regulation 565, operators of public pools and spas must be trained in the safe operation of the facility. The requirement in Reg. 565 (Public Pools) for operator training is new for operators of public pools. There is no specific training course identified at this time, however the regulation specifies that the operator must be trained in public pool and public spa operation and maintenance, filtration systems, water chemistry and all relevant safety and emergency procedures. There are existing training courses and resources available through many local public health units and industry providers which may be used to meet this requirement.

    Through the Recreational Water Protocol, public health units are required to ensure training materials are available and to promote recreational water facility training to owners and operators. As a guide, courses should contain information on the following topics, which are found in the Recreational Water Protocol:

    1. Public health legislation and regulations, as applicable;
    2. Prevention of illness, injury or death;
    3. Pool water chemistry;
    4. Sanitary operation of other amenities in the facility;
    5. Provision of safety equipment;
    6. Emergency communication and procedures;
    7. Safety supervision;
    8. Admission Standards, as applicable; and
    9. Record keeping.

    Instructor: Ross Rankin CRFP, CAT, CPO, Property and Project Manager, Town of Carleton Place and Amanda Nadeau, CAP, RRFS, Aquatic Supervisor, City of Timmins and Cameron Evanoff, CPO, Supervisor, Facility Operations, City of Mississauga

    This course is worth 21 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Wednesday, May 15, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Friday, May 17, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Bowmanville
    • 20
    Register

    Aquatic Facility Operations

    Wednesday, May 15 to Friday, May 17, 2023, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Garnet B. Rickard Recreation Complex, Hall 3, 2440 Hwy 2, Bowmanville ON L1C 0K6

    The ORFA Aquatic Facility Operations course reflects the diversity of today’s Ontario’s public water recreation infrastructure. Through extensive member evaluation and feedback, the ORFA has shifted the learning focus from traditional Class A & B swimming pool operational responsibilities towards the different types of recreational aquatic facilities that includes the newly classified Class C pools. This advanced aquatic training course is considered industry leading as it takes practitioners who have obtained a Certified Pool Operator (CPO) credential, or other similar introductory aquatic training course, with an advanced study of aquatic facility operations. The ORFA worked closely with the former National Swimming Pool Foundation (NSPF) and the Canadian Red Cross (CRC), to develop an enhanced curriculum specific to meet the learning needs of Ontario aquatic professionals. The educational approach includes an opportunity for professional aquatic operational staff to enhance their aquatic training and workplace experience while allowing recreation staff who are responsible for non-traditional water operations to attend and learn of their responsibilities, and how to effectively operate and maintain the equipment and infrastructure.

    This course is a required educational component of ORFA’s Certified Aquatic Technician (CAT) professional designation. Positioned as an equivalent to ORFA’s highly respected Certified Ice Technician designation, the CAT credential is positioned to be in high demand by employers. Participants will be provided with a self-directed guide titled Passport Toward Competency. The guide will list recommended workplace-specific, as well as educational activities, to assist the participants in achieving aquatic facility operations competency, as best determined by their employer.

    Topics include:

    • Indoor and outdoor Class A & C pool regulatory compliance and operational best practices
    • Aquatic mechanical room equipment maintenance best practices
    • A review of advancements in water disinfection and chemistry
    • Waterslide, saunas, steam rooms etc. maintenance and upkeep
    • Pool chemical safety and management
    • Indoor pool air quality
    • Maintaining aquatic sensing equipment
    • Indoor and outdoor aquatic PPE
    • Outdoor pool operational best practices
    • Working alone safely in an aquatic environment
    • Workplace injuries and reporting compliance
    • Completing efficient logbook entries
    • Aquatic housekeeping risks, hazards and best practices
    • Risk reduction and avoidance strategies
    • Emergency preparedness and management

    Please Note:

    According to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care – Regulation 565, operators of public pools and spas must be trained in the safe operation of the facility. The requirement in Reg. 565 (Public Pools) for operator training is new for operators of public pools. There is no specific training course identified at this time, however the regulation specifies that the operator must be trained in public pool and public spa operation and maintenance, filtration systems, water chemistry and all relevant safety and emergency procedures. There are existing training courses and resources available through many local public health units and industry providers which may be used to meet this requirement.

    Through the Recreational Water Protocol, public health units are required to ensure training materials are available and to promote recreational water facility training to owners and operators. As a guide, courses should contain information on the following topics, which are found in the Recreational Water Protocol:

    1. Public health legislation and regulations, as applicable;
    2. Prevention of illness, injury or death;
    3. Pool water chemistry;
    4. Sanitary operation of other amenities in the facility;
    5. Provision of safety equipment;
    6. Emergency communication and procedures;
    7. Safety supervision;
    8. Admission Standards, as applicable; and
    9. Record keeping.

    Instructor: Ross Rankin CRFP, CAT, CPO, Property and Project Manager, Town of Carleton Place and Amanda Nadeau, CAP, RRFS, Aquatic Supervisor, City of Timmins and Cameron Evanoff, CPO, Supervisor, Facility Operations, City of Mississauga

    This course is worth 21 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Wednesday, July 10, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Wednesday, July 24, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Virtual
    • 20
    Register

    Building Operations and Maintenance

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    • Session 1: Wednesday, July 10 – 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
    • Session 2: Wednesday, July 17 – 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
    • Session 3: Wednesday, July 24 – 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

    Too often recreation staff are hired with an expectation that they clearly understand essential cleaning and housekeeping techniques with most failing to have any real concept on how to properly perform these tasks. What occurs is every staff member approaching the same work with a different concept on how best to complete the work resulting in a waste of chemicals and time as well as damaged fixtures and materials. This course has introduced many practitioners to proven fundamental principles and techniques associated with practical maintenance applications of one of the primary responsibilities in all recreation facilities - cleaning. This outcomes of this course significantly improves the relationship between the staff member conducting the cleaning tasks and those who supervise or manage these individuals. The course begins with applying applicable examples of risks and hazards associated with the work and the importance of adopting internal health and safety policies specific to this type of work. Instructors are senior facility managers who understand that all recreation facility frontline staff are unofficial community ambassadors and customer service specialists and will confirm that their actions are vital to creating an enjoyable, safe recreation experience. The focus then shifts to other legislative responsibilities that control public recreation facility upkeep. The participants will learn that their lapse in workplace judgement, or commitment to policy and procedure, can result in legal repercussions that can only be defended through proper recordkeeping. In addition, the reality of poor housekeeping and maintenance activities reducing building life-cycle is explained. Moving forward, participants will be instructed in proven recreation specific housekeeping and maintenance activities. The focus will be placed on cleaning chemistry, proportion management, basic housekeeping tool use and storage, advancing equipment technologies, the importance of quickly controlling bacteria and mold and maintaining original building materials luster and shine.

    Topics include:

    • Understanding the importance and legal obligation of proper building maintenance and upkeep through scheduled cleaning and maintenance
    • Functioning under public scrutiny – working safely and efficiently in a recreation facility includes having a positive appearance and attitude – customer service is an important part of frontline staff’s duties
    • Knowing what legislation guides Ontario’s recreation facilities in being obligated to provide safe and healthy buildings
    • The risks and hazards associated with public facility housekeeping and maintenance
    • The role that proper housekeeping and maintenance plays in worker and public emergency management
    • The importance of adopting proven housekeeping and building maintenance activities
    • A hands-on demonstration by leading janitorial experts of how to efficiently use and maintain standard housekeeping equipment and what is new in the marketplace

    Personal Protective Equipment Required: Participants attending this course must supply and wear their own CSA-approved footwear suitable for operating cleaning equipment inside a recreation facility. No exceptions.

    Instructor: Mark Reinert, CRFP, CIT, CPT, Manager of Civic Properties, Town of Petawawa, and Frederick Horvath, CRFP, CMM III, former Director of Operations, Municipality of Clarington (retired)

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Wednesday, August 07, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Wednesday, August 21, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Virtual
    Register

    Basic Arena Refrigeration (BAR)

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    • Session 1: Wednesday, August 7, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
    • Session 2: Wednesday, August 14, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
    • Session 3: Wednesday, August 21, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

    The ORFA Basic Arena Refrigeration course is considered the minimum industry-recognized standard for ice arena facility personnel. The Occupational Health and Safety Act demands that those who conduct work in these environments be “competent” while the Operating Engineers Regulation requires that all who have “privilege to enter a registered refrigeration plant room” be qualified. Such qualification and competency require a strong foundation of all regulatory obligations to be met followed by an introduction to the principles and fundamentals of the theory of refrigeration and concluding with a risk and hazard assessment overview of a typical refrigeration plant room.

    Once the legislative requirements and theoretical overview is complete participants will move on to understand that the refrigeration process operates on scientific principles that are applied to practical mechanical processes in Part Two. Students will be introduced to the different types of ice arena refrigeration plant designs and key pieces of equipment required to safely transfer heat plus the role of safety devices during this transfer. In addition, participants will be able to identify the types and the amounts, as well as the storage and disposal of refrigerants and lubricants.

    Emphasis is placed on the need for worker safety which depends on the proper use of personal protective equipment from all noxious gases and/or refrigerants stored on site. Operator and public safety further rely on the operator’s ability to monitor plant conditions, liquid levels, pressures, and temperatures and take appropriate action under the circumstance. Hazards of electricity, temperature and pressures are introduced so that plant monitors can recognize the importance of plant piping markings so not to touch these delivery mechanisms, not to place hands or feet near pumps or motors or make unqualified plant adjustments. Monitors must understand the need to conduct regular plant checks and the importance of recording these activities in the official plant log. Course participants will gain an appreciation for the proper use of plant room ventilation and the role of the refrigeration safety devices and alarm systems. Once this knowledge has been obtained, participants will clearly understand the importance of their role during plant room emergencies and the need to embrace and practice evacuation plans for both worker and general public safety.

    Of further benefit would be a guided tour of a refrigeration plant room under the leadership of a competent plant operator for an orientation of a registered refrigeration plant room and review the plant operational and training manuals.

    Topics include:

    • Refrigeration Theoretical and Practical Factors
    • Refrigeration Codes, Regulations and Acts
    • Ice Rink Refrigeration Equipment, Controls and Safety Devices
    • Ice Rink Refrigeration Plant Safe Operations and Maintenance
    • Refrigeration Emerging Technologies and Energy Management

    Workplace-Specific Training: A reminder is given to facility supervisory staff that to complete the educational process successful participants must return to work and be provided with specific workplace-specific training.

    Online Exam: Exam must be completed online within 30 days of attending the in-person course.

    Instructor: Robert W. Lilbourne, CRFP, CIT, Director, Community Services, Municipality of Strathroy-Caradoc and Brad Putnam, Recreation Facility Services Manager, City of Peterborough

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Wednesday, September 11, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Wednesday, September 25, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Virtual
    Register

    Advanced Refrigeration Facility Operator

    Instructor-led Course Online (ILC-OL). This course will be taught using Zoom.

    • Session 1: Wednesday, September 11, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
    • Session 2: Wednesday, September 18, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
    • Session 3: Wednesday, September 25, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

    Final Assessment: You will receive email notification from the ORFA on how to access the online exam. The online exam opens on November 2 at 9:00 am and closes on December 1 at 11:59 pm. You have up to thirty calendar days to complete the exam. Once you access the online exam you must complete it within the allowed period at that one sitting.

    The course is designed to enhance the knowledge and skills of practitioners who are considered to be the “user” as defined in the Operating Engineers Regulation of a registered “unattended” industrial ice sheet refrigeration plant. It builds on the knowledge learned in the ORFA Basic Arena Refrigeration course which is a recommended course pre-requisite. Participants will gain a strong working knowledge of roles and responsibilities associated with the operation, management and maintenance of these systems. Course curriculum is built on current regulatory responsibilities and accepted industry best practices. The learning objectives are recognized by the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) as minimum training for those individuals who are responsible for decision making surrounding the day-to-day care and control of these plant rooms. Participants will receive all necessary tools to evaluate and/or build an ice sheet refrigeration workplace specific training, operational and maintenance program.

    Topics include:

    • Module 1 - Defining Who Is In Care & Control of the Registered Ice Sheet Refrigeration Plant 
    • Module 2 - The Responsibility of Creating a Safe Registered Ice Sheet Refrigeration Plant Room 
    • Module 3 – The Responsibility of Mentoring Ice Sheet Refrigeration Plant Room Staff 
    • Module 4 – Creating and Maintaining a Plant Operational and Training Manual 
    • Module 5 - The Responsibility of Creating an Effective Registered Refrigeration Plant Maintenance Plan 
    • Module 6 – The Responsibility of Designing a Registered Refrigeration Plant Asset Management Plan 
    • Module 7 – The Responsibility of Registered Ice Sheet Refrigeration Emergency Planning 

    This is a recommended course for the ORFA Certified Arena Refrigeration Plant Technician (CARPT) designation. This course is also recommended ongoing professional development for B-Certificate Operators who are employed in the ice sheet industry.

    This course will be taught using Zoom. Participants need no special computer skills or set-up other than:

    • an internet connection that should be able to provide a data download and upload minimum speeds of one Megabit per second (Mbps) or better - broadband connection is recommended.
    • a computer and monitor
    • a webcam, not compulsory but recommended
    • a microphone
    • desire to interact, network, and learn from the comfort of their home/office. 

    Instructors: Robert W. Lilbourne, CRFP, CIT, Director, Community Services, Municipality of Strathroy-Caradoc and Brad Putnam, Recreation Facility Services Manager, City of Peterborough

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Tuesday, October 15, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Thursday, October 17, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Peterborough, ON
    • 30
    Register

    Recreation Facility Environmental Systems Management

    Tuesday, October 15 to Thursday, October 17, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Peterborough Sport and Wellness Centre, 775 Brealey Drive , Peterborough, ON K9K 0B8

    Ice rinks integrate automation software to maximize equipment performance, lifecycle and assist with the reduction of energy usage. To meet these challenges, it is essential that all facility staff have a basic working knowledge of the science and mechanical application of air exchange for both human safety and ice quality.

    For a successful building operation, frontline operators must have a working knowledge of equipment design and function of building controls to respond effectively to real time operational challenges that impact energy costs, user comfort, building furniture and fixtures, and construction material longevity. In addition, operators must comprehend how air management equipment interrelates with the refrigeration equipment.

    Topics Included in Course:

    • Industry Issues
    • Recreation Equipment Design
    • Regulated Responsibilities Management
    • Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Management
    • Safety and Operational Controls
    • Dehumidification Management
    • Electrical System Management
    • Water System Management
    • Mechanical Operational and Maintenance Best Practices
    • Facility Service Contractor Relationship
    • Energy Management
    • Lifecycle and Asset Management

    Presenters: Terry Piche, Director, Training, Research and Development, ORFA and Brad Putnam, Manager, Recreation Facility Services, City of Peterborough and representatives from CIMCO Refrigeration, I.B Storey and Marmak.

    This course is worth 28 professional development credits towards recertification of any ORFA professional designation

    • Monday, October 21, 2024
    • 8:30 AM
    • Wednesday, October 23, 2024
    • 4:30 PM
    • Cambridge, ON
    • 20
    Register

    Cemeterian™ Operations and Management

    Monday, October 21 to Wednesday, October 23, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Hespeler Memorial Arena, 640 Ellis Rd, Cambridge ON N3C 4A8

    A cemetery is defined as “land that has been set aside for the interment of human remains.” The reality is that cemeteries are also workplaces. Cemetery workers are general ground maintenance workers with priority being the tending to graves and memorial sites. Additional duties include interments, assessing stability of memorials, maintaining cemetery furniture and other related infrastructure. What places them apart from traditional grounds workers is the sensitivity required to provide a compassionate and professional environment. The grieving process must be understood when dealing with persons especially those not wanting to comply with cemetery rules of conduct and proper operation of the cemetery. Additionally, working near heavy equipment, use and care of specialty tools associated with cemetery operations in all types of weather conditions can be high risk if not performed correctly.

    Cemetery workers are covered under the Occupational Health and Safety Act and as such must meet the obligation of “competent person” as defined in the Act. The Act further requires that burial authorities provide a safe workplace and systems of work that will protect the employees, persons attending and officiating at funerals, visitors and any other person that may use a cemetery. The training course has been designed to showcase proven safe work practices and to encourage a process of thought that will assist with accident prevention while ensuring professional conduct by those responsible for daily cemetery operations.

    Training will include presentations by industry leaders such as funeral directors, government officials, monument builders and cemetery designers. Participants will gain firsthand experience on general grounds and buildings, operational activities while understanding the role and importance of historical infrastructure such as chapels and mausoleums.

    Topics include:

    • A history of cemeteries
    • Cemetery regulatory compliance – The Funeral, Burial and Cremation Services Act
    • Understanding Cemetery By-laws – what can and cannot be controlled
    • Cemetery worker safety
    • Reducing risks and hazards
    • Grave preparation protocols – ground layout, opening and closings procedures
    • Marker installations – proper foundation preparation and safe placement
    • Understanding cremation interment options
    • Importance of proper record keeping
    • The significance of compassion and professionalism when dealing with bereaved persons
    • Understanding burial options – traditional grave, cremation scattering, placement and storage choices
    • Burial trends – bio-cremation, natural burials etc.
    • Effective communication and documentation systems that control and record information associated with interment
    • Cemetery equipment and safe work practices
    • Reviewing the role and opportunities associated with memorial trees and furniture
    • Dealing with cemetery vandalism
    • Preparing for special events – Mother and Father’s day preparations
    • Effectively handling on-site complaints
    • Proper grave layout
    • Grave opening, set-up, and closing
    • Proper marker installation
    • Cremation layout
    • Cremation opening, set-up, and closing
    • Columbarium layout
    • Columbarium opening, set-up, and closing
    • Conduct a cemetery risk assessment
    • On-site equipment and specialty tools of the trade

    Workplace-Specific Tr